<h2>Celebrating <strong>Beauty</strong> & Diversity</h2><h3>Superb Fairy-wren</h3> <h2><strong>Bringing Back</strong> Vanishing Species</h2><h3>Regent Honeyeater</h3> <h2><strong>Sharing,</strong> Exploring & Discovering</h2><h3>Discovering Shorebirds outing</h3> <h2><strong>Connecting</strong> with Nature's Wonders</h2><h3>Double-banded Plover</h3> <h2>Sharing Nature's Awesome <strong>Majesty</strong></h2><h3>Yellow-nosed Albatross</h3> <h2>Planting a <strong>future</strong> for threatened species</h2><h3>Capertee Valley tree planting</h3> <h2><strong>Reducing</strong> the Threat of Extinctions</h2><h3>Superb Parrot</h3>

Bird Conservation

January 12th, 2020

Australia’s bushfire crisis – an update on our birds

Photo Banner: Laughing Kookaburra, Wallabi Point, NSW © Adam Stevenson

 

Dear Friend,

Our hearts reach out to everyone impacted by Australia’s ferocious and devastating bushfires. Some of the stories we’re hearing from BirdLife staff, volunteers and supporters are truly heartbreaking. And terrifying. We are thinking about you and your families.

 

I’d particularly like to thank all the volunteers who are at the frontline of this fire emergency; from firefighters working long hours in the hot ash and blood red skies, to people in the community who are stepping up to support each other. You are amazing.

 

Distressful events impact us physically, mentally and emotionally. If you or your loved ones have been affected by the bushfires, or you are feeling overwhelmed, I encourage you to seek help, using services such as Lifeline on 13 11 14.

 

As well as the terrible loss of life and property, experts estimate more than 500 million animals have been killed so far, including threatened species close to our hearts, such as Regent Honeyeaters, Eastern Bristlebirds and Glossy Black Cockatoos. Many of the surviving birds have lost breeding and feeding habitat and now face starvation.

 

The scale of the wildlife emergency is unprecedented, which is why we are stepping up to do our bit for Australia’s birds. BirdLife is already planning and coordinating a disaster response; we need to understand the impact on threatened birds and work with our partners to put emergency plans in place for now and the longer-term.

 

As soon as it is safe to do so, our own monitoring activities across the fire affected areas will recommence. Staff will be going out to check on the Northern Eastern Bristlebird population, which had at least three key areas of habitat hit by fires in south-east Queensland and northern NSW late last year. We also know fires have been through parts of the Capertee Valley and other known Regent Honeyeater breeding sites but we won’t know how bad it is until we can get out there. And these are just two of hundreds of bird species from across the country that have been impacted by catastrophic fires.

 

You can help BirdLife Australia lead the disaster recovery effort for threatened birds by donating to our appeal. Your support will help give threatened native birds a more hopeful start to the new year. Thank you.

 

To the many people who have contacted us to ask what else they can do to help, you can always make sure that fresh water is available to birds over the summer months. Another option is to get involved with your local BirdLife branch or group.

 

I remain hopeful that, if we all listen to the science and pull together, we can help bushfire-ravaged communities and birds bounce back.

 

With best wishes,

 

Paul Sullivan, CEO

 

June 25th, 2019

REPORT OF 15TH BIRD SURVEY AROUND GRENFELL



Report of 15th BIRD SURVEY around GRENFELL in the SOUTH WEST SLOPES KEY Biodiversity Area

 

Elisabeth Karplus

On Saturday March 23rd, 32 surveyors took part in the 15th survey around Grenfell in the South West Slopes Key Biodiversity Area (KBA). The survey group included four surveyors from Grenfell. One surveyor came from Forbes, six from Canberra while the rest came from Sydney and surrounds. Eight people were new to the survey. We were able to have seven survey groups with most groups surveying on four sites. Other survey leaders apart from myself were Allan Richards, Jill Molan, Ron Broomham, Graham Fry, David Winterbottom and Russell Beardmore.  I thank all the survey leaders.

During the survey 11 Superb Parrots were seen on five sites including on “Rosemont”, which is owned by Mikla Lewis, one of the Grenfell surveyors. However 70 additional Superb Parrots were seen during the weekend with a maximum flock size of 29 birds. A single Diamond Firetail was seen on one site in Warraderry State Forest. Of other threatened species, one Brown Treecreeper, six Hooded Robins (three sites) and four Speckled Warbler (three sites) were seen on survey sites. Several interesting species were seen in Warraderry State Forest including two Southern Whitefaces, Varied Sittellas, a Striped Honeyeater and Double-barred Finches. Another unexpected sighting was of a Peregrine Falcon. Seven species of honeyeaters were seen including a single White-fronted Honeyeater, which is more common further inland.

 

Red-capped Robin

Red-capped Robin                                                                                                              Photographer: Colette Livermore

Overall 25 Red-capped Robins were seen on eight different sites.  The maximum number of species seen on any site was 14 species (two sites). The maximum number of birds in any site was 84 (49 of these were Apostlebirds or White-winged Choughs) though most sites had many fewer birds.

Grey-crowned Babbler with nest material.                                                                                             Photographer: Dianne Deans

 

more »

May 15th, 2019

Regent Honeyeater and Swift Parrot surveys 2019

The first of the biannual survey periods for the critically endangered Regent Honeyeater and Swift Parrot commences this coming weekend. We are seeking your assistance to search for both species across their range in Victoria, NSW, ACT and southern Queensland.

As has been the approach for many years, the targeted survey periods occur on the third weekend in May and first weekend in August, and up to a week either side. Thus for 2019 the two survey periods are:
– 13th to 26th May*
– 27th July to 11th August

If you are interested and available to help do searches at our suggested locations this May, we encourage you to get in touch with your regional coordinator. Or, if you are uncertain of who your relevant regional coordinator is and/or where you would like to search, send us an email (woodlandbirds@birdlife.org.au) and we’ll forward your message through to the right person. Some areas may have coordinated surveys already planned, but for the most part we are simply asking people to conduct searches for these critically endangered and rare species.

The May and August survey periods are now embedded in many peoples’ calendars and it is a great way of maximising participation in seeking out these elusive birds. But it is important to remind everyone that BirdLife Australia maintains the sightings database for both species, so we are also very interested in any opportunistic sightings of both species at any time of year. We have pieced together the update from the August 2018 surveys, which you will find here noting that it includes a detailed account of sightings of both species throughout the remainder of 2018.

If you find either species, you can complete and submit the survey form (word and PDF versions) which can be found on our website. It can be returned either to us directly or to your regional coordinator. Alternatively you can simply email or call us. If you undertake a search but are unsuccessful in detecting either species, please let us or your regional coordinator know but it is no longer necessary to fill out these sheets for unsuccessful searches. During the surveys, we encourage you to submit records of other bird species from the locations you have visited to the BirdLife Australia ‘Birdata’ Atlas, either through the website portal or the app.

Sightings of Regent Honeyeaters are of particular interest at any time. Please let one of the team know as soon as possible if you see one or more, including – where possible – a precise location and any colour leg band details. A photo for confirmation is also helpful if possible. You can also contact us with Regent Honeyeater sightings using a Freecall number (1800 621 056).

Dean Ingwersen, Chris Timewell, Caroline Wilson & Emily Mowat
Mick Roderick M 0421 761 237 mick.roderick@birdlife.org.au

 

(*Apologies from the editor. Computer downtime and some emails not arriving have caused this notice to be late. IB.)
January 19th, 2019

Brush-turkeys in Suburbia. A project report by Matthew Hall at the February Club meeting

The Australian Brush-turkey (Alectura lathami) has become an increasingly common sight in the parks and backyards of suburban Australia. Their success in exploiting the big city has led to conflict with homeowners, who blame the birds for tearing up garden beds and lawns indiscriminately as they forage and build their nests. Added to this is a growing list of complaints including stealing pet food, chasing pets and small children, making a racket walking on tin roofs, and fouling swimming pools. . . . . . . . . . .”

Read more here

 

June 20th, 2016

Tree planting in the Capertee Valley – April 2016 report



John Rawson reports on tree planting in the Capertee Valley – April 2016

1-capertee treeplanting1