<h2>Celebrating <strong>Beauty</strong> & Diversity</h2><h3>Superb Fairy-wren</h3> <h2><strong>Bringing Back</strong> Vanishing Species</h2><h3>Regent Honeyeater</h3> <h2><strong>Sharing,</strong> Exploring & Discovering</h2><h3>Discovering Shorebirds outing</h3> <h2><strong>Connecting</strong> with Nature's Wonders</h2><h3>Double-banded Plover</h3> <h2>Sharing Nature's Awesome <strong>Majesty</strong></h2><h3>Yellow-nosed Albatross</h3> <h2>Planting a <strong>future</strong> for threatened species</h2><h3>Capertee Valley tree planting</h3> <h2><strong>Reducing</strong> the Threat of Extinctions</h2><h3>Superb Parrot</h3>
November 8, 2017

Annual Photo Competition Prizes awarded

Birding NSW 2017 Photographic Competition Results:

 

The winning photo taken by Alfred Schulte:

 

 

The top ten:

1) Eastern Grass Owl         Alfred Schulte             First prize

2) Peregrine Falcon           Michael Hanvey          Second prize

3) Dusky Grasswren          Christine Schulte        Group of Birds winner

4) Marbled Frogmouth       Alfred Schulte

5) Bar-tailed Godwit          Michael Hanvey

6) Willie Wagtail                Maria Mazo Lavin       Birds in Flight winner

7) Ruddy Turnstone           Michael Hanvey

8) Bell Miner                     David Turner              Single Bird winner

9) Australian Ringneck      Michael Hanvey

10) Barking Owl               Alfred Schulte

 

A truly wonderful array of images delighted the audience at the announcement of the top ten photos in this year’s photo competition.  It was more than enough reason to go out but for those who could not the slideshow can be viewed here for a limited time. (Page down for successive photos.)

Congratulations to all the entrants and especially to the prize winners.

August 25, 2017

Volunteers needed

The club runs on work by a number of volunteers.  Office bearers volunteer their time and skills to keep the club going.  Volunteers organise and  carry out surveys, keep club records, maintain databases of membership and of bird surveys, lead outings and social gatherings, respond to enquiries from members and non-members alike, publish newsletters, organise meetings and speakers, provide club pins and badges, maintain registers of sightings, maintain a website and a host of other seldom seen administration.  Every function really needs a backup person.   

We are in need of volunteers to back up some of the work we do.

In particular we need a volunteer to manage the clubs emails. This role involves redirecting incoming emails to appropriate club officers.  It would be ideal if the club had a number of members who could time share this job.

Do you have skills you would be willing to use to keep the club going?

Adequate training can be provided.

It may be possible to job share by carrying out only some of the functions. If you are interested in joining in or assisting as back-up person,  please contact one of the Committee members.

July 27, 2017

Bird song: Is it music?

Hollis Taylor takes you on a journey around this question.  Be sure to leave time to listen to the songs.

June 6, 2017

Amended and revised Constitution adopted

The Special General meeting of 2 May 2017 resolved, nem con, to approve the revised constitution as it has appeared on the website.  The revised constitution can be downloaded here:

May 16, 2017

Lake Cowal in the last flood

Report by Malcolm Carnegie,

Photography by Malcolm Carnegie

Projects Manager – Lake Cowal Foundation

 

Commencing in late June 2016, flooding rains over much of inland NSW through to the end of October 2016 saw the Lachlan River and Bland Creek  fill Lake Cowal to a flood peak equivalent to that of 1990.

A flooded Bland Creek looking north to Lake Cowal

Once full, water flows from the north of Lake Cowal near Bogies Island into Nerang Cowal. From here, the Manna and Bogandillon Creeks flow into the Bogandillon Swamp and ultimately back into the Lachlan River.

Black Swans

When full, Lake Cowal covers an area of approximately 13,000 hectares with a length of 21 kilometres by 9.5 kilometres at its widest point, having a maximum depth of 3.5 metres, and taking a period of up to three years to dry mostly through evaporation, provided no significant inflows occur.

 

During the Spring/Summer/Autumn of 2016/17 a variety of waterbirds took the opportunity to breed in both the lignum areas and fringing river red gums of the lake. Species feeding and/or breeding in the various habitats of the lake included:

  • Royal Spoonbill and Yellow-billed Spoonbill;

    Royal Spoonbill

  • White-necked Heron and White-faced Heron;
  • Nankeen Night Heron;
  • Great Egret;
  • Little Black Cormorant, Little Pied Cormorant and Pied Cormorant;
  • Australasian Darter;
  • Eurasian Coot;
  • Australasian Grebe and Great Crested Grebe;

 

Red-necked Avocets

Juvenile Nankeen Night-Heron

  • Red-necked Avocet;
  • Black Swan;
  • White-headed Stilt;
  • Whiskered Tern;
  • Sacred Kingfisher;

    Sacred Kingfisher

 

  • Plumed Whistling Duck, Pink-eared Duck, Blue-billed Duck, Chestnut Teal and Pacific Black Duck;

 

  • Plumed Whistling-Ducks

    Straw-necked Ibis

 

  • Australian White Ibis, Straw-necked Ibis and Glossy Ibis;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Magpie Goose observed and breeding for the first time since 1990.

 

Magpie Geese

White-necked Heron

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presently approximately 2,000 Australian Pelicans are fishing the shallower northern sections of Lake Cowal with the water level presently relatively stable through the winter months. With no further inflows, the lake is expected to have water in it through to the 2018/19 Summer.

 

Pelican-rookery; Nimmie-Caira

 

Pelican-rookery-Feb-17-Nimmie-Caira

 

Pelican rookery photographs were taken by by Vince Bucello at Nimmie Caira.

 

 

April 7, 2017

Members are invited to submit their favourite photographs

Members are invited to submit photographs they have taken and wish to have displayed on the club website or to have published in the newsletter. All photographs must be the work of the submitting member (for copyright reasons) and should be 640Kb  minimum size (so that they may appear in reasonable resolution) .  Photographs can be submitted by email at the following address: info@birdingnsw.org.au or to newsletter@birdingnsw.org.au

When submitting a photograph – or two – please indicate whether you would like to have it displayed on the website or in the newsletter.

 

Check out this video of the Malleefowl and its mound