<h2>Celebrating <strong>Beauty</strong> & Diversity</h2><h3>Superb Fairy-wren</h3> <h2><strong>Bringing Back</strong> Vanishing Species</h2><h3>Regent Honeyeater</h3> <h2><strong>Sharing,</strong> Exploring & Discovering</h2><h3>Discovering Shorebirds outing</h3> <h2><strong>Connecting</strong> with Nature's Wonders</h2><h3>Double-banded Plover</h3> <h2>Sharing Nature's Awesome <strong>Majesty</strong></h2><h3>Yellow-nosed Albatross</h3> <h2>Planting a <strong>future</strong> for threatened species</h2><h3>Capertee Valley tree planting</h3> <h2><strong>Reducing</strong> the Threat of Extinctions</h2><h3>Superb Parrot</h3>
August 10, 2021

Bunyip Bird Australasian Bittern Summit 2022

June 24, 2021

Protecting the migratory birdlife in the Port Hacking

Here is an important (to you) letter from our Office of Conservation.

Port Hacking tidal flats are home to critically endangered eastern curlews. Their numbers have crashed by around 80% in just 3 decades and if we don’t help them now could be extinct in a generation. 

Please ask the Royal National Park to incorporate the feeding flats at Deeban Spit, Maianbar, Port Hacking into the Royal National Park. Migratory shorebirds are one of the most endangered bird species groups in the world. The area in Port Hacking they use is totally unprotected and could see them become locally extinct if the Royal does not take them on as part of their stewardship. 

The draft plan of management is available here where you will also find the address to which you can send your comments

This is a good video clip to share: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwx1RpgyGhc

 Stepwise instructions to readers:

  1. read this letter
  2. write one of your own to National Parks and Wildlife
  3. send it (addresses here)
  4.  get a friend to start at step 1.
  5. rest a little while and dragoon another friend.
June 23, 2021

New website for ORAC

The website includes a comprehensive Index of Cases which includes all NSW reports that have been submitted to NSW ORAC and BARC both accepted and not accepted, and also includes known reports of rare species for which no submission was made. Most of these latter reports are shown at the end of the Index of Cases as not confirmed/not assessed but some have case numbers since, in the early days of NSW ORAC, case numbers were sometimes assigned when a sighting was claimed but which was not followed up with a submission. The Index of Cases can be searched by species names, dates, sites, etc and there is also a downloadable PDF version.

 

The latest revision of the NSW ORAC Review List is on the site as a PDF file and the URR Form is on the site as a downloadable Word document which can be used to prepare submissions to the committee.

 

Vist the site here:  www.nsworac.org/

May 21, 2020

Amusing?

Well, the music is good and since we have been deprived of bird and concert song alike, it may please.

Bird Song Opera

January 12, 2020

Australia’s bushfire crisis – an update on our birds

Photo Banner: Laughing Kookaburra, Wallabi Point, NSW © Adam Stevenson

 

Dear Friend,

Our hearts reach out to everyone impacted by Australia’s ferocious and devastating bushfires. Some of the stories we’re hearing from BirdLife staff, volunteers and supporters are truly heartbreaking. And terrifying. We are thinking about you and your families.

 

I’d particularly like to thank all the volunteers who are at the frontline of this fire emergency; from firefighters working long hours in the hot ash and blood red skies, to people in the community who are stepping up to support each other. You are amazing.

 

Distressful events impact us physically, mentally and emotionally. If you or your loved ones have been affected by the bushfires, or you are feeling overwhelmed, I encourage you to seek help, using services such as Lifeline on 13 11 14.

 

As well as the terrible loss of life and property, experts estimate more than 500 million animals have been killed so far, including threatened species close to our hearts, such as Regent Honeyeaters, Eastern Bristlebirds and Glossy Black Cockatoos. Many of the surviving birds have lost breeding and feeding habitat and now face starvation.

 

The scale of the wildlife emergency is unprecedented, which is why we are stepping up to do our bit for Australia’s birds. BirdLife is already planning and coordinating a disaster response; we need to understand the impact on threatened birds and work with our partners to put emergency plans in place for now and the longer-term.

 

As soon as it is safe to do so, our own monitoring activities across the fire affected areas will recommence. Staff will be going out to check on the Northern Eastern Bristlebird population, which had at least three key areas of habitat hit by fires in south-east Queensland and northern NSW late last year. We also know fires have been through parts of the Capertee Valley and other known Regent Honeyeater breeding sites but we won’t know how bad it is until we can get out there. And these are just two of hundreds of bird species from across the country that have been impacted by catastrophic fires.

 

You can help BirdLife Australia lead the disaster recovery effort for threatened birds by donating to our appeal. Your support will help give threatened native birds a more hopeful start to the new year. Thank you.

 

To the many people who have contacted us to ask what else they can do to help, you can always make sure that fresh water is available to birds over the summer months. Another option is to get involved with your local BirdLife branch or group.

 

I remain hopeful that, if we all listen to the science and pull together, we can help bushfire-ravaged communities and birds bounce back.

 

With best wishes,

 

Paul Sullivan, CEO

 

August 25, 2019

What birds are these?

 

 

Photographer Megan Walton

What causes ‘leucism’?

Leucistic Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo

Leucistic Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo

 

Bird Leucism

 

Find out more?

 

Or that one?

Photo by Colette Livermore